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Napkins

Plain Weave, Striped, Checked Dobby Design, Plain, Stripe & Checked Design Jacquard Weave, Oxford Weave, Satin Weave and Drill & Twill Weave in different count & constructions as per your requirement. Products are available in wide range of variety and styles.

Production: After the yarn is procured from the mill, it undergoes Dyeing - Weaving - Stitching / Tailoring and Finishing stages. Finally the finished products are thoroughly inspected for final delivery. No child labour is involved in the production of goods.

Cotton & its blends, Linen, Voile, Polyester - handloom/power loom in plain, dobby & jacquard weave and voile. Ring spun or opened quality yarns.
"It is OK to use a napkin for wiping the face or scraping the teeth, and a most vulgar error to wipe one's nose with it."
"The person of highest rank in the company should unfold his napkin first, all others waiting till he has done so before they unfold theirs. When all of those present are social equals, all unfold together, with no ceremony."

"Twelve napkins, a large tablecloth and a small one, comprise what is called these days a 'table service."

The first napkin was a lump of dough the Spartans called 'apomagdalie', a mixture cut into small pieces and rolled and kneeded at the table, a custom that led to using sliced bread to wipe the hands. In Roman antiquity, napkins known as sudarium, "handkerchief," was a pocket-size fabric earned to blot the brow during meals taken in the warm Mediterranean climate.
In the early Middle Ages, the napkin disappeared from the table and hands and mouths were wiped on whatever was available, the back of the hand, clothing, or a piece of bread. Later, a few amenities returned and the table was laid with three cloths

  1. The first cloth, called a couch was laid lengthwise before the master's place.
  2. The second cloth, a long towel called a surnappe, was laid over the couch, indicating a place setting for an honored guest.
  3. The third cloth was a communal napkin that hung like a swag from the edge of the table. An example can be seen in The Last Supper by Dierik Bouts (1415-1475), which hangs in Saint Peter's Church, Louvain, Belgium.

The napkin had gone from a cloth laid on the table to a fabric draped over the left arm of a servant. The maitre d' hotel, the man in charge of feasts, as a symbol of office and rank, draped a napkin from his left shoulder, and servants of lower rank folded napkins lengthwise over their left arms, a custom that continued into the eighteenth century.
"If napkins are distributed, yours should be placed on the left shoulder or arm; goblet and knife go to the right, bread to the left."
By the seventeenth century, the standard napkin was approximately 35 inches wide by 45 inches long, a capacious size that accommodated people who ate with their fingers.

The acceptance of the fork in the eighteenth century by all classes of society brought neatness to dining and reduced the size of the napkin. Today, the napkin is made in a variety of sizes to meet every entertainment need: large for multicourse meals, medium for simple menus, small for afternoon tea and cocktails.